3 Responses to Statuette

  1. Paula Hornbostel says:

    “Statuette”, also known as “Nude with Coat” (Isabel’s list at Beinecke Library, Yale University) is a small but dynamic sculpture full of the promise of what lay ahead for Gaston Lachaise. Her small size is inversely proportionate to the power and energy harnessed by the woman and her robe. A sense of uplift, exuberance and unabashed sexuality burst from her, her tossled hair long and sensuous, reflecting the style of the day. Her leg extends past the coat, enticing the viewer, her high-heeled slipper punctuating the long line of her leg. With Statuette, one of Lachaise’s earliest tributes to ‘Woman,’ Lachaise brings the rhythmic potential of the human figure to new heights. She is reminiscent of the tremendous creative power captured by Rodin’s statue of Balzac. Here is ‘Woman’ with a capital W, as Lachaise described her. She would get the vote in 1920.

    A poem called “Captive” written by Isabel, Lachaise’s muse model and eventual wife, is a perfect mate for this sculpture.

    Captive
    I draw my cloak about me
    That you may not see my body
    And I come to you
    And I ask that you set me free
    That I may come to you without my cloak
    And that you may understand
    That my body is mine to give.
    –Isabel Cyr, circa 1903-1915
    According to Isabel, (told to by Gerald Nordland in 1951) Gaston Lachaise was at work in the studio of Henry Hudson Kitson on MacDougal Alley, when Arthur B. Davies and Gutzon Borglum came visting in search of sculpture for the upcoming Armory Show. Lachaise showed them Statuette of 1912, which they exhibited in Gallery A.

  2. paula HorNbostel says:

    “Statuette”, (“Nude with Coat”) is a small but dynamic sculpture one of his earliest tributes to ‘Woman.’ Her small size is inversely proportionate to the power and energy harnessed by her robe or coat. A sense of uplift, exuberance and unabashed sexuality burst from the robe, her tossled hair long and sensuous, reflecting the style of the day. With Statuette Lachaise brings the rhythmic potential of the human figure to new heights, reminiscent of the creative power captured by Rodin’s statue of Balzac. Here is ‘Woman’ with a capital W, as Lachaise described her. Here is Woman who would get the vote in 1920.

    According to Isabel, (told to by Gerald Nordland in 1951) Gaston Lachaise was at work in the studio of Henry Hudson Kitson on MacDougal Alley, when Arthur B. Davies and Gutzon Borglum came visting in search of sculpture for the upcoming Armory Show. Lachaise showed them Statuette of 1912, which they exhibited in Gallery A.

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