Timeline

<h3>DECEMBER 14, 1911</h3>Artists Henry Fitch Taylor, Elmer MacRae, Walt Kuhn, and Jerome Myers meet In New York City to explore the prospect of forming a society that will exhibit the work of young artists. Many of them are frustrated with the lack of venues to show their work and with the power of the more traditional National Academy of Design which is seen as a powerful force in the New York City art world. <h3>DECEMBER 19, 1911</h3>The Association of American Painters and Sculptors founded when twelve more artists join Henry Fitch Taylor, Elmer MacRae, Walt Kuhn, and Jerome Myers with the stated goal of exhibiting "the
works of progressive and live painters, both American and foreign; favoring  such work [usually] neglected by current shows and especially interesting and instructive to the public." <h3>SEPTEMBER 2, 1912</h3>Davies sends Kuhn a catalogue of a show in Cologne, Germany, The International Art Exhibition of the Federation of West German Art-Lovers [Patrons] and Artists, declaring, "I wish we could have as good a show as the Cologne Sonderbund—I think you would do well to see it before the close on Sept. 30th." <h3>SEPTEMBER 30, 1912</h3>Walt Kuhn, having arrived in Cologne the previous evening, spends the entire day at the Sonderbund exhibition. He writes Vera,  his wife, "Sonderbund great show! Van Gogh & Gauguin great! Cezanne didn't hit me as hard. ... I met Munch, the Norwegian this morning fine fellow." <h3>DECEMBER 8, 1912</h3>Walt Kuhn in The Hague where he first sees the work or Odilon Redon whom he referred to as "a big Frenchman. Hardly known at home, but  he is a wonder, already 72 years old  ... He will make a hit in the show..." <h3>OCTOBER 25, 1912</h3>Walt Kuhn arrives in Paris after his stops in Germany and the Netherlands. Arthur B. Davies has provided Kuhn with an introduction to Walter Pach and the two comb Paris seeking work for the exhibition. <h3>NOVEMBER 5-12, 1912</h3>Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn in Paris choosing works for the Armory Show. Pach introduces them to avant-garde artists including the Duchamp brothers and Constantin Brancusi. Davies purchases work from Brancusi for his personal collection. <h3>NOVEMBER 12, 1912</h3>Kuhn and Davis visit Roger Fry's Second Post-Impressionist Exhibition at the Grafton Galleries (October 5-December 31, 1912). This exhibition would become a significant source of loans for the Armory Show, particularly for those works by Matisse. Fry was an important British artist and critic. Walt Kuhn takes this show's success as a sign that the Armory Show would appeal to the American public. <h3>NOVEMBER 30, 1912</h3>Walt Kuhn and Arthur B. Davies arrive back in New York on the Celtic after a whirlwind tour of Europe were they procured hundreds of works for the A.A.P.S. exhibition. <h3>DECEMBER 1-15, 1912</h3>A circular invites all artists, professional and non-professional, to submit work for consideration in the "First International Exhibition." Works in any medium were said to be welcome. The circular was signed by Davies and John Mowbray Clark. <h3>DECEMBER 14, 1912</h3>Walt Kuhn writes Vera Kuhn that he came up with an idea for the Armory Show emblem--a pine tree taken from an American Revolutionary War flag. Davies made the drawing. <h3>FEBRUARY 2, 1913</h3>Grand Central Terminal designed by Reed & Stem and Warren & Wetmore opens. The new structure allows trains powered by electricity (versus steam trains which necessitated large steam sheds) to run through tunnels and enter Grand Central Terminal on two levels. This also enabled New York City planners to put the Park Avenue tracks underground thereby reuniting large swaths of the city. <h3>FEBRUARY 17, 1913</h3>The International Exhibition of Modern Art opens in New York City. Attendance in the month the exhibition is in New York will be 87,000; in Chicago, 188,000; in Boston, 14,000 <h3>FEBRUARY 18, 1913 - MARCH 1, 1913</h3>Annual exhibition of the Woman's Art Club at the Macbeth Gallery, featuring 52 paintings and sculptures by 37 women. The exhibit overlaps the Armory Show, but none of the participants  has any involvement with the Armory Show. The noted lack of involvement of these women  in the A.A.P.S. indicates that there may have been a boycott of the Armory Show on the part of some female artists at the time. <h3>MARCH 4, 1913</h3>Woodrow Wilson is inaugurated and Theodore Roosevelt visits the Armory Show. TR writes a review, "A Layman\'s View of an Art Exhibition," published on March 29th in Outlook.He observed that the American public had a right to see the work being created in Europe but he did not like it, comparing the Nude Descending a Staircase to a "Navajo rug in his bathroom ... [which made] a far more satisfactory and decorative picture." <h3>MARCH 4, 1913</h3>Woodrow Wilson is inaugurated and Theodore Roosevelt visits the Armory Show. TR writes a review, "A Layman's View of an Art Exhibition," published on March 29th in Outlook. He observed that the American public had a right to see the work being created in Europe but he did not like it, comparing the Nude Descending a Staircase to a "Navajo rug in his bathroom ... [which made] a far more satisfactory and decorative picture." <h3>MARCH 5, 1913</h3>Duchamp's famous Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2) is sold to Frederick C. Torrey who bought the painting for $324.00. In 1927 Walter Arensberg who eventually donated it to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. <h3>MARCH 8, 1913</h3>Association of American Painters and Sculptors holds a celebratory dinner for "friends and enemies" of the Armory Show at Healy's Restaurant at 66th and Columbus. Most major art critics are invited, including Royal Cortissoz of the Tribune, Arthur Hoeber of the Globe, and Byron Stephenson of the Post. The guests sign a menu for the press. <h3>MARCH 24, 1913</h3>The International Exhibition of Modern Art opens in Chicago. According to Harriet Monroe, writing for The Chicago Tribune, the show attracted 1,802 visitors on its first day. The Art Institute of Chicago hosts the exhibition making it the only museum in America to do so. <h3>APRIL 24, 1913</h3>At 7:30 pm on April 24, newly elected President Woodrow Wilson celebrates the opening of the Woolworth Building by pressing a button in his Washington D.C. office and every light in the New York skyscraper lights up. At 792 feet high, it was the tallest building in the world. Hundreds of men dressed in white tie celebrate at a banquet in the Woolworth Building. <h3>APRIL 28, 1913</h3>The International Exhibition of Modern Art opens in Boston. It was hosted by the Copley Society of Boston at Copley Hall. Unfortunately, it never quite achieves the popularity that it had seen in New York. At its close on May 19 its attendance is merely 14,000 as opposed to New York where 87,000 attended and Chicago where 188,000 saw the exhibition. <h3>JUNE 7, 1913</h3>Mabel Dodge, John Reed, Margaret Sanger and other radicals organize the Paterson Strike Pageant in Madison Square Garden, New York City. Singing songs along the way, approximately 15,000 workers march to Madison Square Garden to play themselves in a dramatization of the event.  The Pageant's purpose was to publicize the strikers' cause and to bring attention to the violent response of the Paterson police. Robert Edmond Jones designed the cover of the program.